THE HATE U GIVE

by Angie Thomas

A 16-year-old girl sees a police officer kill her friend.

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2 positive comments

0 neutral comments

3 negative comments

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What people are saying on Twitter (sample)

  • "The Hate U Give" is one of the most powerful and impactful books I've ever read, also probably my new favorite boo… https://t.co/FTTzakJMmx
  • I'm still quite upset that The Book Thief wasn't in the nominee list of Best of the Best @goodreads Choice Awards.… https://t.co/pMDjSGdcRM
  • Who wants to dive into my spiel on police brutality on this lovely evening? I reviewed The Hate U Give by Angie Tho… https://t.co/XdK0ST3KOJ
  • the hate u give is absolutely amazing. book and movie. 10/10 recommend
  • I need to read the hate u give too ! Got my book for November I’m almost done đź’™ https://t.co/PGyD6GQuaq
  • 3 positive comments

    1 neutral comments

    4 negative comments

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    What people are saying on Amazon (sample)

    • This is the story of 16-year-old Starr, a girl who witnesses her life-long friend get killed by a police officer while unarmed. She balances between two worlds while the murder makes national news: the one where she lives surrounded by non-traditional families and neighbors who’ve seen it all and gangbangers and business owners in a black community filled with people whose choices are never easy, and the one where she goes to a mostly-white private school at which she becomes a completely different version of herself so nobody knows about her home world. But it’s so much more than that. And that’s why I am going to ask people who can’t relate to this story—particularly white people—to read it as soon as they possibly can.The reason I believe reading books by people who aren’t your and your experience’s doppelgänger is important is because it allows us to pluck at the threads of truth about other peoples’ lives, experiences, secrets at our own pace and in our own heads as we go along (note: I am white). We get to know them, see them, emotionally connect with them. Read enough of these stories, and we become able to see the real people in our world who are represented by those characters. We become more empathetic to and more understanding of their situations, even when they are so vastly different from our own that our knee-jerk reactions to their real-life words/actions/decisions tend to be denial, rejection. A disbelief because it doesn’t seem right or doesn’t feel comfortable.Reading these stories connects us in a way our world needs right now, and THUG is the book we should all be reading.
    • I had originally said I was not going to read this book, I didn't know how well I would like it, and I don't tend to get involved with things that can make life at work harder for me. I literally work with the police, I am a dispatcher, so it is a huge part of my life. I knew going in it was revolved around the BLM movement, and police brutality and I made the decision to read it anyways. I had heard so many good things about it and I just needed to see for myself. First I want to say, it does not at any point in this book bash police officers. It talks about some of the problems in the world and how things happen but it never attacks or sets out to make them out to monsters. I really liked that because most aren't, they just aren't, they are humans. Now, Starr is the main character who is involved in a horrible tragedy that leaves her friend from child hood Khalil dead by an officer involved shooting. It was horrible and it was really sad. I hated reading it, I cried my eyes out, Thomas did such an amazing job of making a horrible action into beautiful fiction that made you feel like you were right there. I was so broken by this part of the story. Then reading later on into Starr's grief was just hard. I don't know any other way to describe it but there will be tears, so very many tears. That isn't it though, you see her as they have to fight the system basically, and you are with them through all those emotions. Going to the funeral and seeing his family, destroyed, his mother broken, knowing this isn't just something that happens in fiction, you cannot help but be moved. Now there was some real good in this book too, like some parts that I laughed until I cried. The scene when her parents are arguing in the middle of a prayer I have read an thousand times since finishing the book because it is the funnies thing I have ever read. Her parents were amazing by the way, her dad was an ex-con but he loved her, he admitted his mistakes but he was there for her. Their relationship was really touching to read because I have always been really close to my own dad. Then there was her mom, and her Uncle Carlos, who was actually a cop and lived in a really good neighborhood too. This was really refreshing to read because so many books, YA especially make parents out to be monsters that don't care, that aren't there for their kids. I mean it is like a troupe or something for these stories and it isn't actually the norm and gets annoying to read, so this book did an amazing job with the parents and family. All around though this story just floored me, it gave me a perspective I have never considered before, offered insights into a world I am not a part of, and I loved every minute of it. I don't know what it is to watch one friend die by violence of any sort, much less two in the time of my life and I am 26, she is a teenager. It is jarring to see that as someones existence when it is not your own. It taught me to open my eyes... I love it... Honestly I just wanted to pick it right back up and read it again.
    • This is such an amazing, thought provoking and gut wrenching read. I could identify with Starr is many ways while reading this story. Starr is the key eye witness to the murder of her childhood friend, Khalil and she's put in a tough position. Everyone is so quick to say what they would do in certain situations but when you're point in that situation, it isn't as easy as it seems. She goes through a lot of emotions dealing with the death of her friend and I felt her pain with her. As a person of color I've had several thoughts like Starr. I know what it's like to be judge by the color of my skin. Having to act a certain way so you won't be classified as the "angry black girl". The automatic assumption I live in the ghetto, I don't. This book was such a powerful read and reflected heavily on current situations. I encourage everyone to read this book! White, black, brown, yellow, red, polka dot. Everyone can benefit from reading this powerful read. For a debut book Thomas knocked it out of the park! I loved her writing, the plot and the flow of the story. I felt like I was living it out alongside Starr and her family while reading. I'm looking forward to reading more books by her in the future!
    • Okay, this review is probably going to be short and sweet since it has been so long since I read this book.What I DO remember about this book is that it was SO good! It will make you angry, it will make you sad, it will open your eyes and enlighten you. Starr is such an amazing character. She has to go through things that no kid should have to go through. But she's so strong and handles it so well, despite the strong (likely) possibility of an unfavorable outcome.I loved the family dynamic in this book. I loved how much Starr's family all loved and cared for each other. It's so refreshing to see a full, functional family for a change.Another thing I really liked about this book was the sense of community in Garden Heights. I loved all the interactions between the different people and seeing how much they all loved their community. That's not something I recall seeing in really any books and I enjoyed it.A couple of things I remember wanting to talk about regarding this book:-While I was reading this book, I remember thinking that Sekani was an odd name. And I love that this was actually addressed in the book and that it totally put me in my place. I don't remember exactly what was said, but I remember I liked it. But I feel like I can't really say anything about anyone's name because I feel like Cyra is an odd name.-I was so so so glad when Starr stopped putting up with Hailey's crap. She was a really rotten friend and it made me sad to think that Starr had to be a different person around her white friends at school.Overall, this book was fantastic! I was a bit late to the party on reading this one, but I would definitely recommend it if you are also fashionably late to this party. It is powerful and deserves every single ounce of hype that it gets and MORE!
    • 4.5 stars!“Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.”The Hate U Give is about a sixteen year old girl named Starr who lives in a bad neighborhood and commutes to a fancy private school. One evening, Starr and her childhood friend Khalil leave a party and are pulled over by a cop on the way home. The cop shoots and kills Khalil, even though he was unarmed.Khalil becomes a national headline, and Starr is thrown into turmoil. The neighborhood she grew up in wants justice, as does Starr. But being the sole witness to Khalil’s murder comes with danger, from drug lords where she lives, and the police everywhere else. Starr had already felt pulled between two worlds before Khalil’s death, and now she doesn’t know what choices to make.“What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be?”This is a book that I really hope becomes a worldwide phenomenon. We’ve seen similar stories on the news many times, throughout the years, but I feel the youth of the world have not been given this story in a relatable way. There should be more books like this out there.Starr is what made this book come alive. Her voice, the way she tells her story is extraordinary. Every single moment of this book I felt for this girl: I wanted to stand beside her, I wanted to cheer her on, I wanted to hold her. She was faced with circumstances and choices no one her age should ever have to face. Confronting these events were hard for her, and while she didn’t always do what everyone told her to, she stayed true to herself and handled it the best she could.I felt so many things while reading this book, it really does pull on several different emotions. Being Angie Thomas’ debut novel I am floored by her talent, many writers work their entire life to bring this kind of voice to their characters. I can only see better things to come in the future from Thomas. My only criticism of the book was it felt a little bit too long for me, but otherwise I loved it and will be recommending this novel a lot and for a long time.“Brave doesn't mean you're not scared. It means you go on even though you're scared.”