WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING

by Delia Owens

In a quiet town on the North Carolina coast in 1969, a young woman who survived alone in the marsh becomes a murder suspect. Read by Cassandra Campbell. 12 hours, 12 minutes unabridged.

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3 positive comments

2 neutral comments

0 negative comments

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What people are saying on Twitter (sample)

  • @sarahgdougherty Read “where the crawdads sing” ... it’s a book. And it’s good. You’ll love it. Xoxo
  • Book #83: I just read "Where the Crawdads Sing" for the #50BookPledge https://t.co/PjFe7jZGEv via @savvyreader
  • This one is late in posting, but the November book of the month is Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens.… https://t.co/HB7RI96038
  • @SavidgeReads Spotted Where the Crawdads Sing on your shelf... absolutely stunning book, easily one of my favorite… https://t.co/VMPSHH4JfJ
  • @MohamedMOSalih Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. Such a beautiful book, I loved it!
  • 6 positive comments

    0 neutral comments

    4 negative comments

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    What people are saying on Amazon (sample)

    • This book had so many fantastic reviews. I was looking forward to reading it but quickly became disillusioned. I'm from NC and have never heard anyone talk with the type of accents Ms. Owens chose for her characters. It seems like a small thing but it was extremely distracting, and eventually became ridiculous, especially because the characters somehow switched back and forth between speaking like Mark Twain's Jim to perfect English. It made me wonder if the author has ever been to our fair state. The story was good enough, albeit predictable, and it's obvious the author did her research on marsh life. I learned quite a few wildlife facts that were interesting. The conversations just kept me wrinkling up my nose with distaste and I ended the book on a sour note.
    • This is one of the most moving, caring, emotional novels I have ever read. I read this book only because I had met Delia and have read her wildlife books she wrote with husband Mark Owens. After starting the book this was all I could think about for days. Kya's life become part of mine and the characters ceased to live on the page... they were alive with me and I was in the marsh, feeling every feather - the air, creatures and the plants. Jumpin' became a trusted friend and so many moments touched my very soul. I should not have been surprised as Delia has a great style in her wildlife books that I love to read. But a novel like this is not my normal read. Maybe I need to now reconsider what I choose as this book stopped me cold and made me rethink a lot that happened in my life. Delia touched the human soul with her behavioral descriptions. She is not only a respected wildlife scientist, she is a human behaviorist and understands more about the human condition that just about anyone else I know. This is a tremendous treasure of a book and I'm sure it's staying in my read again list for a long time. Highly recommend the book.
    • I am extremely stingy with my compliments for good books, but this tale is well-deserving of the praise. Of the last dozen or so books I've read, only two others earned five complete stars by me: She Read to Us in the Late Afternoons: A Life in Novels by Kathleen Hill, and Circe by Madeline Miller.I have to confess that I have also had magical moments with marsh creatures such as herons, eagles, and mud turtles. Like the main character, Kya, I am a compulsive collector of treasures from those Great Rock Tumblers: the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean which makes this book so attractive to me. However, Delia Owens' writing is more than just about the natural world. She spins a good and very well-written tale about murder, courtroom drama, nature, poetry, and even love.Another reviewer described Owens' writing as lyrical. It is. Take your time and savor every sentence.
    • My favorite book of the year by far. So beautifully written. No skimming over sections in this book. I devoured every single word. I laughed, I cried (a lot) and most importantly thought differently about life - mine and everyone else's. I became the character of Kya, desperately alone and forced to try to eke out an existence on her own in the marshes. The marshes are their own separate character, but despite the fact that I am freaked out by insects and mud and most other creepy crawlies, I could actually imagine myself enjoying the Carolina experience, hard as it was. You will root for Kya, I did, sometimes shouting out loud- You Go Girl!!!!! I read this book in one day and can't stop thinking about it. There are several clues to the surprise ending if you pay attention to the details. This is a KEEPER!
    • What a book for the senses! After finishing it, I’m still so full of sights, smells, tastes, emotions; I think it will stay with me for a long, long time. It’s a beautiful, incandescent story written with lyrical prose that weaves seamlessly from the past to the current time in which the story is set. I was completely immersed in a marsh in North Carolina and didn’t want the story to end. The ending...didn’t see it coming. Just...wow. The whole book is wow.