LEONARDO DA VINCI

by Walter Isaacson

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1 positive comments

3 neutral comments

1 negative comments

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  • @bobarmsnovelist @BCDreyer You’ve hit the nail on the head. Dan Brown was too ignorant to know that Da Vinci wasn’t… https://t.co/12vWEkWt51
  • Wisdom is the daughter of experience. Leonardo da Vinci https://t.co/WqTTIEEYXF
  • Leonardo da Vinci - Sketch Art and Study Illustrations - 40 Trading Cards Book – Available Now: https://t.co/ijES9MEtmu via @etsy
  • This book Leonardo Da Vinci by Walter Isaacson is amazing! Shows where mans curiosity can lead man to surreal experiences and living.
  • I read Big debt Crises by Ray Dalio, a bit of Bob Woodward’s ‘fear’ [won’t count it]. Currently reading Leonardo D… https://t.co/NKMZy9mAIF
  • 7 positive comments

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    3 negative comments

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    What people are saying on Amazon (sample)

    • Isaacson does not consider Leonardo as a genius in the same sense as Isaac Newton and Einstein who had brains beyond the realm of we mere mortals, rather he looks at Leonardo as more human, though a man of intense curiosity -- about everything -- who could assimilate imagination and technology, in essence one of the first renaissance men. Isaacson has focused on Leonardo's notebooks and he has traveled to all the archives where the originals are maintained – a definitive work on the life of Leonardo da Vinci.This book is written as though one is talking a leisurely stroll with an art expert who is pointing out all the subtle details in each work. Early on Leonardo was an apprentice to Verrocchio. They worked together [collaborated] on “Tobia and the Angel” and on the “Baptism of Christ”. What is so astounding is that the use of modern X-ray analysis enables one to discern which part of the work was done by Leonardo and which part was done by Verrocchio. By the time of the “Baptism of Christ,” Leonardo was clearly surpassing his master.Via this book, I feel as though I am taking a leisurely stroll through the works of the masters and obtaining a priceless art education. However I realize, that in order to best appreciate this book, one must have an adequate exposure to art, art history, history in general, the Bible, the classics, the Greeks, etc. One cannot just pick up this book and fully appreciate Leonardo without a fair understanding of what came before.Wonderful. A great book for leisurely reading in a quiet reflective mood, one cannot race through it.
    • On this Thanksgiving Day 2017 I am grateful that I am able to sit down quietly and read Isaacson's biography of a man who died almost exactly 500 years ago. A man whose story describes the turning point in history , the Renaissance, when the unknown craftsman became the artist of the posterity, a common man could be come a celebrity, whose personality would itself become subject of admiration and study for the ages. As Walter Isaacson noted about Einstein, the lives of such personalities are now more relevant than ever - they lived life on their own terms, depending not on community or tradition for their achievements, their own inventions their own creations their only reward. And so it is for every man, woman alive today - we have Google, Amazon, and (yuck) Facebook - and can get all the information we want, buy anything we need to satisfy our dreams and follow where our curiousity and imagination will lead us ; 'Stay hungry, stay foolish' as Steve Jobs would say. We are no longer bound by custom and tradition, but as Steve Jobs again reminded young Stanford grads 'You are all going to die soon' Death is greatest change agent of life ' and we must define ourselves in the time we have by what we do, what we create, what we leave behind. There is no instruction book, unfortunately, on how to be unique, how to be creative, how to find and keep your identity in a world where everyone can be a prophet on the Internet, everyone a genius, everyone a madman. We can only give thanks that we have such marvelous examples provided to us - by one of the greatest biographers (along with David McCullough) of all time. Happy Thanksgiving!
    • Walter Isaacson does a wonderful job portraying the life of Leonardo da Vinci. The text goes more or kess in chronological order and is, in my opinion, the best biography of Leonardo out there. Bramly's biography comes close but is clearly out of date (not mentioning recent attributions). Isaacson clearly knows the historiography. He repeatedly cites scholars like Martin Kemp in telling the stories of recent attributions (Salvator Mundi, La Bella Principessa). Isaacson is also familiar with the work of Toby Lester (Vitruvian Man, Francesco di Giorgio). In terms of history, Isaacson has a clear general grasp of the great men who influenced Leonardo (such as Alberti). Leonardo's various interests, skills, shortcomings, and curiosity are explored in great detail. Additionally, the book is well-illustrated and includes numerous images from his notebooks, his paintings, and key locations. Finally, Leonardo da Vinci has a current biography aimed at a popular audience written by perhaps the greatest biographer of the early-twentieth century. I highly recommend this text.
    • I recall Joshua Cohen’s opening sentence of his novel The Book of Numbers: “If you’re reading this on a screen [redacted!] off. I’ll only talk if I’m gripped with both hands.” Walter Isaacson’s latest book Leonardo da Vinci cries out for that tactile experience. I’ve collected books for twenty years – from the 15th Century to the Present – and this biography is perhaps the most finely crafted, and most beautifully illustrated, book – I’ve seen in many years (The most recent contemporary corollary is Giulio Tononi’s “Phi: A Voyage from the Brain to the Soul”). I’m willing to delay my judgment of the writing quality given that I’ve read the inestimable “Einstein” by the same author. In sum: Buy It, Read It, Enjoy It. This is a rare gift.
    • Magnificent Biography of one of the worlds great innovators. This book is massive, not only in length but in depth. Isaacson's biographical narrative is seamlessly interwoven with analysis and context of the work of da Vinci. The book itself is beautifully printed on high quality paper with numerous well rendered illustrations abundantly presented. In presenting da Vinci's personal thoughts and events of his life, Isaacson identifies sources supported by plenty of end notes and citations. You really see the scope of research and care that went into completing what will easily become the biography of record of the great master. Having read previous da Vinci biographies I contend that one of this versions strengths is its interpretation of da Vinci's relationship to the artists, scientists and philosophers of not just his contemporaries, but of his continued influence on those disciplines throughout human history and contemporary thought. Really quite an accomplishment. The downside of reading about da Vinci is how it can make you feel a great personal loss for time wasted on meaningless pursuits.